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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 167-172

Hospitalizations for tuberculous peritonitis in the United States: Results from the national inpatient sample database from 2002 to 2014


1 Department of Internal Medicine, Adolescent and Internal Medicine, Western Michigan University Homer Stryker M D School of Medicine, Kalamazoo, MI, USA
2 Department of Biostatistics, Adolescent and Internal Medicine, Western Michigan University Homer Stryker M D School of Medicine, Kalamazoo, MI, USA
3 Department of Infectious Diseases, Adolescent and Internal Medicine, Western Michigan University Homer Stryker M D School of Medicine, Kalamazoo, MI, USA
4 Department of Pediatrics, Adolescent and Internal Medicine, Western Michigan University Homer Stryker M D School of Medicine, Kalamazoo, MI, USA

Correspondence Address:
Eric Martin Sieloff
Department of Internal Medicine, Western Michigan University Homer Stryker M D School of Medicine, Kalamazoo, MI
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijmy.ijmy_68_20

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Background: Tuberculosis (TB) is an uncommon disease in the Western hemisphere that can present with peritoneal involvement, as tuberculous peritonitis(TBP) causing abdominal pain and fever. The healthcare and economic burden of TBP in the United States remains unknown. Methods: The National Inpatient Sample database was utilized to investigate TBP hospitalizations from 2002 to 2014. Economic expenditures, patient and hospital demographics, and associations of certain comorbidities with TBP were analyzed. Results: A total of 5878 hospitalizations for TBP occurred over the 12-year duration, with $420 million in-hospital charges. The median patient age was 45 years (interquartile range: 31.1–61.7), with the majority being Hispanic (27.15%). Hospitalizations occurred primarily in the Western (31.3%) and Southern (31.7%) United States. Patient comorbidities and the respective odds ratio associated with TBP included HIV (33.56), continuous peritoneal dialysis (10.49), malnutrition (7.38), liver cirrhosis (6.87), and liver cirrhosis sequelae (6.91). Nearly 6.37% of TBP hospitalizations also had active pulmonary TB. Conclusion: Although TBP is uncommon in the United States, it should be considered in patients presenting with abdominal pain and fever and a history of HIV, continuous peritoneal dialysis, malnutrition, liver cirrhosis, or liver cirrhosis sequelae.


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