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REVIEW ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 231-238

Port-site infection due to nontuberculous mycobacteria following laparoscopic surgery


1 Department of Infectious Diseases and Microbiology, Marie Bashir Institute for Infectious Diseases and Biosecurity, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
2 Department of Infectious Diseases and Microbiology; Sydney Medical School and the; Marie Bashir Institute for Infectious Diseases and Biosecurity, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
3 Marie Bashir Institute for Infectious Diseases and Biosecurity, University of Sydney, Sydney; Department of Paediactric Surgery, Children's Hospital West Mead, Australia

Correspondence Address:
Waniganeththi Arachchige Manori Piyumal Samaranayake
No. 57/17, Railway Station Road, Veyangoda
Australia
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijmy.ijmy_32_20

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Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are commonly found in soil and water and can cause nosocomial infections by contaminating equipment and disinfectants solution used in hospitals. NTM port-site infection after laparoscopic surgery is increasingly observed, but its clinical features, management, and prevention have not been reviewed adequately. We performed a comprehensive literature review of reports that described the clinical manifestation and management of NTM port-site infections following laparoscopic surgery. The perceived increase in NTM port-site infections is likely multifactorial, influenced by greater awareness, better diagnostics, changes in medical practice, increased prevalence of immunosuppression, and potential pathogen spread. Widespread resistance to common disinfectants is a major concern. Patients with NTM port-site infections typically present 1–3 months after the laparoscopic intervention with chronic local and minimal systemic symptoms. Surgical excision plays an important role in localized or refractory cases. Medical treatment should be guided by species identification and in vitro drug-susceptibility testing (DST) of the infecting NTM strain, with a combination of second-line antituberculosis agents, given for a prolonged duration. NTM port site infection is best prevented by meticulous skin preparation and infection control, using only sterilized supplies for laparoscopic surgery.


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