• Users Online: 535
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
ARTICLE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 4  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 16

Modification of ChPL (chitosan protein–lipid) nanoparticles for in vitro release of rifampicin (RIF)


1 Experimental Medicine and Tissue Engineering Center, National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (NRITLD), Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
2 Medicinal plant and drug Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, Iran
3 Mycobacteriology Research Center, National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (NRITLD), Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Jalaledin Ghanavi
Experimental Medicine and Tissue Engineering Center, National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (NRITLD), Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, P.O. 19575/154, Tehran 19556
Iran
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.1016/j.ijmyco.2014.11.038

Rights and Permissions

During recent years, the implication of nanoparticles (NPs) as drug delivery systems has gained much scientific attention. As drugs do not deliver themselves, a nanoparticle can act by optimizing drug delivery in the right place, at the right time and at the right dosage. In previous years, this research successfully developed and evaluated the ChPL-NPs nanoparticles (chitosan protein–lipid) [US patent pending 20140370500]. In the present investigation, rifampicin (RIF) ChPL-NPs nanoparticles were designed and developed. Consequently, the in vitro release of RIF ChPL-NPs nanoparticles was investigated. Material and Methods: Briefly, chitosan powder (90 KD and 90% degree of deacetylation) was dissolved (1% acetic-acid) and mixed with gelatin (3%). Then, the lipid and rifampin in ether was precipitated by rotary vacuum evaporator. Under high speed homogenizer (12,000rpm), both solutions (chitosan–gelatin & rifampin–lipid) were mixed [US patent pending 20140370500]. The obtained RIF ChPL-NPs were put into a dialysis bag with cut-off 14 KD in phosphate buffer solution (pH=7.4). The release of RIF was obtained by reverse phase HPLC using C18 (250 × 4.6 mm, 5 μm) column. The mobile phase consisted of 50:50 v/v acetonitrile and 10 mm potassium dihydrogen phosphate (pH=3.2) and flow rate 1 ml/min. The column temp was maintained at 25 °C with UV detection at 335nm. Results and conclusions: The average size of RIF ChPL-NPs was about 50–250nm. The release of RIF from the dialysis bag started after 30 min which was 2400ng/ml; after 16 h the release of RIF was 15,000ng/ml; and at 40 h the concentration reached to 19,600ng/ml. Therefore, these results showed a slow release of RIF from ChPL-NPs. Basically, the intensity of the surface charges in nanoparticle is important as it determines their interaction with bioactive compound. In RIF ChPL-NPs, lipid had negative charges, whereas chitosan and gelatin had positive charges. The electrostatic interaction between oppositely charged ions would ultimately cause an effective system drug delivery. RIF ChPL-NPs is not only suitable for intravenous administration, but it can be used as an inhalation aerosol, because this nanoparticle has a capacity to adhere to mucosal surfaces and transiently open the tight junction.


[PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1002    
    Printed28    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded101    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal