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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 7  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 137-142

Evaluation of the tuberculosis control program in South West Cameroon: Factors affecting treatment outcomes


1 Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Science, University of Buea, Banjul, The Gambia
2 Laboratory Services Department, Medical Research Council Unit, The Gambia at London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Banjul, The Gambia
3 Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Science, University of Buea, Banjul, The Gambia; Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, Laboratory for Emerging Infectious Diseases, University of Buea, Cameroon; Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, University of Fort Hare, Alice, South Africa
4 Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, Laboratory for Emerging Infectious Diseases, University of Buea; Department of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Buea, Cameroon; Center for Tropical Diseases, University of Texas Medical Branch, Texas, USA

Correspondence Address:
Nicoline Fri Tanih
Laboratory Services Department, Medical Research Council Unit, The Gambia at London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Banjul
The Gambia
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijmy.ijmy_20_18

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Background: Tuberculosis (TB) has been ranked as one of the leading causes of death worldwide. In Cameroon, the National Tuberculosis Control Program aims to fight TB through the implementation of international directives (Directly Observed Treatment Short course [DOTS]). TB control program must reach global targets for detection (70%) and treatment success (85%) as stated by the United Nations Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Implementing DOTS in Cameroon has not met the MDGs of 85% success rate. This study aimed at identifying factors affecting treatment success. Methods: A cross-sectional retrospective study was used to collect data from 895 TB registers from January 2011 to December 2012. Out of the seven treatment centers in Fako Division, three were randomly selected following stratification into government, not-for-profit and for-profit structures. Descriptive statistics were used to obtain frequencies. Binomial logistics regression was used to obtain significant values for the various factors. Multinomial logistics was used on significant factors. Results: Of the 895 registered TB patient records obtained, 416 (46.5%) patient were female and 479 (53.5%) patient were male. Characterizing TB patients, 510 (57.0%) were smear-positive pulmonary TB, 225 (25.1%) were smear-negative pulmonary TB, and 160 (17.9%) were extrapulmonary TB patients. Comparing treatment success rate (TSR) across the three centers, Baptist Hospital Mutengene had the highest value 94.97 (38%), followed by Regional Hospital Buea 83.74 (33%), and Central Clinic Tiko the least 73.13 (29%). Conclusion: Patient registration year, treatment center, TB classification, and HIV status were identified to significantly affect TSR, hence, effectiveness of the TB program.


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