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LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 7  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 295

Pulmonary functions' assessment in posttuberculosis cases by spirometry: Obstructive pattern is predominant and needs cautious evaluation in all treated cases irrespective of symptoms


Department of Paediatrics, Al-Kindy College of Medicine, University of Baghdad, Baghdad, Iraq

Date of Web Publication6-Sep-2018

Correspondence Address:
Prof. Mahmood Dhahir Al-Mendalawi
Department of Paediatrics, Al-Kindy College of Medicine, University of Baghdad, P. O. Box 55302, Baghdad Post Office, Baghdad
Iraq
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijmy.ijmy_76_18

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How to cite this article:
Al-Mendalawi MD. Pulmonary functions' assessment in posttuberculosis cases by spirometry: Obstructive pattern is predominant and needs cautious evaluation in all treated cases irrespective of symptoms. Int J Mycobacteriol 2018;7:295

How to cite this URL:
Al-Mendalawi MD. Pulmonary functions' assessment in posttuberculosis cases by spirometry: Obstructive pattern is predominant and needs cautious evaluation in all treated cases irrespective of symptoms. Int J Mycobacteriol [serial online] 2018 [cited 2021 Jun 18];7:295. Available from: https://www.ijmyco.org/text.asp?2018/7/3/295/240695



Dear Editor,

It is worthy to comment on the interesting study by Patil et al. on the pulmonary functions' assessment in post-tuberculosis (TB) cases in India.[1] On employing spirometry, the authors measured various components of pulmonary function tests (PFTs). They found that, in symptomatic post-TB cases, obstructive pattern was the predominant type documented in 42% of cases. However, in asymptomatic post-TB cases, obstructive pattern was documented in 32%, mixed pattern in 14%, and normal spirometry in 46% cases. In symptomatic and asymptomatic cases, obstructive pattern was documented in 210 cases and 160 cases, respectively (P < 0.00001). Abnormal lung function was documented in 70% and 54% in symptomatic and asymptomatic post-TB cases, respectively (P < 0.00001).[1] I presume that such results ought to be cautiously taking owing to the presence of the following methodological limitation. It is obvious that reference values of PFT components are affected by many factors including regional, environmental, and anthropometric factors.[2] To my knowledge, population in India is polygenetic and it is an astonishing amalgamation of various cultures and ethnicities. The author did not consider the ethnic groups of the studied cohort. This is an important point as noticeable differences in spirometric reference values among different ethnic groups do exist.[3] Despite the aforementioned limitation, the study results have clinical implications in the management of TB patients.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Patil S, Patil R, Jadhav A. Pulmonary functions' assessment in post-tuberculosis cases by spirometry: Obstructive pattern is predominant and needs cautious evaluation in all treated cases irrespective of symptoms. Int J Mycobacteriol 2018;7:128-33.  Back to cited text no. 1
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2.
Cb M, Sc K, Babu M. Peak expiratory flow rate in healthy rural school going children (5-16 years) of bellur region for construction of nomogram. J Clin Diagn Res 2013;7:2844-6.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Arnall DA, Nelson AG, Hearon CM, Interpreter C, Kanuho V. Spirometric reference values for Hopi native American children ages 4-13 years. Pediatr Pulmonol 2016;51:386-93.  Back to cited text no. 3
    




 

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