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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 422-428

Role of cerebrospinal fluid C-reactive protein in tuberculous meningitis


1 Department of Internal Medicine, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Department of Internal Medicine, St Vincent Hospital, Worcester, MA, USA
3 Department of Radiology, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India
4 Department of Microbiology, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India
5 Department of Internal Medicine, Unit IV, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India
6 Department of Internal Medicine, Unit V, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India

Correspondence Address:
Ajay Kumar Mishra
Department of Internal Medicine, St Vincent Hospital, 123 Summer Street, Worcester, MA 01545
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijmy.ijmy_178_20

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Background: Tuberculosis (TB) is still a significant health problem worldwide. Central nervous system TB amounts to 10% of all cases of TB. Despite advances in the pharmacological management of TB, the overall outcomes remain poor with significant mortality and morbidity. There are no predictors for neurological outcomes in tuberculosis meningitis (TBM). In this study, we aimed to evaluate the role of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) C-reactive protein (CRP) in predicting mortality and neurological outcome in TBM. Method: In this observational study, all patients with TBM were recruited prospectively over a 12-month duration. Baseline demographic data, laboratory parameters, and Imaging findings were collected. CSF CRP was obtained on the CSF sample collected at the time of diagnosis. Patients were followed up at 3 months to assess neurological status and mortality. Results: Seventy-one patients with TBM were recruited in this study. The overall mortality in this study was 22.5% of patients. The primary composite outcome of mortality and adverse neurological outcome occurred in 40.8%. The CSF CRP levels ranged between 0.1 and 4.8 mg/dl, and the mean CSF CRP level was 1.11 mg/dl. The Relative risk for a patient with high CSF CRP to develop adverse outcome was 1.84 (P = 0.038). CSF CRP was a good predictor of mortality with a relative risk of 2.92 (P = 0.027). Stroke in TBM had a high incidence of 47.9% and a relative risk of 3.42 for an adverse neurological outcome. CSF CRP did not predict the occurrence of stroke. Hydrocephalus and elevated intracranial pressure were good predictors of stroke. Conclusion: TBM is a disease with significant mortality and morbidity. CRP level in the CSF can be measured, but a highly sensitive scale may be needed as the mean values were much lower compared to the serum values. CSF CRP Levels showed significant associations with adverse outcomes and mortality.


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